KLB Bouwblokken, voor elke toepassing van eengezinshuis tot appartementen complex.

Gezond, stil, brandveilig en energiezuinig bouwen met KLB bouwblokken

Je huis als bescherming

Een huis moet aangenaam en comfortabel aanvoelen. Met de KLB bouwblokken zit je er ieder geval warmpjes bij

Volledig natuurlijk

Lever met je woning een bijdrage aan een beter milieu, de bouwblokken zijn ecologisch en duurzaam geproduceerd

Het hoeft niet klein

Met KLB bouwblokken kan tot wel 8 verdiepingen hoog gebouwd worden. En ook voor de kelder is er een goede isolerende steen

Voor elke ruimte van het huis of gebouw

Volledig ecologisch en duurzaam met respect voor de omgeving en de natuur, deels op gerecycleerd materiaal gebaseerd, volledig circulair.

Absoluut onbrandbaar en super geluiddempend

Brandveilig en geluidwerend

Absoluut onbrandbaar en super geluiddempend

Als je energiezuinig wilt bouwen, kun je niet om KLB bouwblokken heen

Revolutionaire Lambdawaardes: van 0,12 – 0,07W/mK

Vanaf Lambdawaarde 0,10 W/mK is het bouwblok geschikt voor passiefhuis bouw.

Bekijk de KLB Bouwblokken:

Een greep uit de blokken: de meest voorkomende blokken voor de Nederlandse markt.

Een met KLB bouwblokken gebouwde woning kan op diverse manieren worden afgewerkt aan de buitenzijde van de woning, voorwaarde is dat de afwerking dampopen is.

Bij een afwerking met bijv. hout of zink is het wel belangrijk de gevel eerst te voorzien van een waterdichte, dampopen stuclaag.

 

Stucwerk

Steenstrips

Tegels

Cladding; bijvoorbeeld zink

Appartementen bouw met KLB bouwblokken

KLB bouwblokken in de hoogbouw

Hoogbouw met KLB bouwblokken

Combinatie van beton met KLB bouwblokken

Informatie over het toepassen van gezonde bouwmaterialen?

Onderstaand tref je de verklaringen betreffende duurzaamheid en ecologie van KLB bouwblokken: (Engels talig)

Environmental assessment of construction products

 

Life cycle assessment data, in particular the calculation of effect assessment data, such as the volume of greenhouse gas emissions, are an important aspect for the ecological assessment of buildings. The environmental accounting of construction products delivers detailed and objective key figures, based on which the path of the product from its manufacture via the utilisation phase until the disposal or reuse can be evaluated. The basis for this data collection is the DIN EN ISO 14040, which divides the building into its individual parts by a comprehensive and independent picture of building products and their environmental impacts, and then submits each part to a separate inspection. KLB-Klimaleichtblock has corresponding environmental assessment verification for its lightweight concrete bricks.

Advantages of Life Cycle Assessment

Identification of optimisation potentials / comparison of alternatives

Information basis for product and process developments in the industry

Creation of base indicators for capturing and measuring environmental impact

(for example basic principles for environmental product declarations, abbreviated EPDs)

Development of marketing potentials via reliable environmental statements regarding the building product.

The structure of a life cycle assessment results from the four phases of its creation:

Definition of the goal and the examination framework

Life cycle inventory of resource use and emissions of the product system

Assessment of the environmental impacts of all input and output flows

Evaluation of the acquired data

 

The first step is to define which purpose the life cycle assessment should fulfil for the company. For example, it can serve as basis for a comprehensive environmental product declaration (EPD) or also “only” indicate energy savings potentials in manufacturing. So it can make sense to exclude life cycles of the product if they are irrelevant for the evaluation. In addition to these system boundaries different impact categories are needed, in which measurements are taken based on functional units.

 

The “Life Cycle Inventory” (abbreviated LCI) of the building product represents the second step for the life cycle assessment. It follows the entire life cycle with regard to all material flows. This encompasses inputs and outputs from the material and possible auxiliary materials, electricity and heat as well as resources and emissions. To be able to guarantee comparability with other products, the individual aspects of environmental impacts must be quantified using measurable number values.

 

Subsequently the impact assessment (Life Cycle Impact Assessment, abbreviated: LCIA) can take place as the third step. It provides a classification of the results from the life cycle inventory by attributing the number values to specific impact categories. Each of these categories is assigned one or more impact indicators. This characterisation then specifies, for example, that for the category “global warming potential” the environmental impacts of all relevant gases must be indicated using the indicator “CO2 equivalents”. Optionally, in conclusion a weighting of the individual impact categories versus each other can take place.

 

 

In the fourth phase the results from the life cycle inventory and the impact assessment are summarised and evaluated. However, any recommendations that can be derived from this are always based on potential, non-actual environmental impacts. Specifically for thecreation of environmental product declarations these insights are extremely helpful though. In order to be allowed to use the EPDs at the end as communication instrument for life cycle assessment data, the data must be verified in accordance with ISO 14025.

 

For the central collection of the life cycle assessment data the so-called ÖKOBAUDAT is used. This online database is the first of its kind to meet the requirements of DIN EN 15804 and is characterised by high data quality. In it are life cycle assessments of building products and processes, which can easily be accessed for the life cycle assessment of the entire building. Of course, the database also includes corresponding data for light-weight concrete masonry.

Overview

Sustainability in Construction

Environmental assessment of construction products

Environmental product declaration

Systems for building certification

 

Sustainability in Construction

At its core, sustainability means preserving life for people and nature on earth across generations. Economical, ecological and social concerns are meant to be in harmony. Based on international conferences, such as the UN summits in Rio de Janeiro (1992) and New York (2015), a definition which places sustainability on these three pillars has established itself.

The federal government has adopted the 3-pillar model and has been pursuing an ambitious programme for the future since 2002 with the sustainability strategy “Perspectives for Germany”. For this long-term planning the construction industry is playing a significant role, as it offers much potential for resource, energy and waste savings.

 

The assessment of sustainability in construction is carried out on the basis of recognised scientific methods such as life cycle assessment or life cycle cost accounting. Standardised criteria measure the quality of sustainability and translate this into reliable building certification systems. The corresponding protection objectives include the conservation of natural resources, the minimisation of life cycle costs and the preservation of health and safety. Building specific assessment criteria for technical sustainability, for example in the areas “fire, noise and thermal protection”, as well as for recycling ability of the building materials used, also play a large role. As KLB-Klimaleichtblock was able to document with its current sustainability report, light-weight concrete has natural advantages for this.

 

In the final analysis, it is important to analyse the building over its entire life cycle and down to the last detail of each individual building product used. Based on the life cycle assessment of a building product so-called Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) therefore are created that serve as the basis for later certification of the entire building. These building certificates offer the residents much helpful information on the sustainability of their own living environment. They guarantee the developer mostly greater competitiveness and better marketing chances.

 

Sustainability in the standardisation process

 

European Building Product Ordinance (BauPVO):

The regulation has been in force since 01.07.2013 and regulates the Europe-wide marketing of construction products on the basis of seven basic requirements. Point 7 “Sustainable use of natural resources” has been added versus the previous standard and focusses on recycling of the resources used after the building is torn down. Requirement 3 “Hygiene, health and environmental protection” has been extended to cover the whole life cycle of a building with regard to the release of hazardous and climate-relevant substances.

 

DIN EN 15804:

The European Committee for Standardisation (CEN/TC 350) has concretised the specifications of the international standard ISO 14025 for creating environmental product declarations (EPDs). The result is DIN EN 15804. It provides basic product category rules (PCR) for the declaration of construction products and construction services of all kinds and thus paves the way for EPDs valid throughout Europe in the future. For their international harmonisation the standardisation work as part of ISO/TC 59/SC 17 “Sustainable Construction” on a global basis and CEN/TC 350 “Sustainability of Buildings” on a European level is indispensable.

Overview

Sustainability in Construction

Environmental assessment of construction products

Environmental product declaration

Systems for building certification

 

Environmental product declaration

 

There are many ecolabels and sustainability seals, as they can be effectively used for marketing. The type III environmental labels or environmental product declarations (EPDs), as they are commonly called, stand apart from the rest: Data analysis during EPD generation makes it possible to identify hotspots of resource deployments, emissions or waste quantities. Manufacturers – like KLB-Klimaleichtblock – take this as an opportunity to design their products and processes to be more ecologically advantageous. This way not only the buildings become more sustainable by selecting the right products, but the individual product used also is improved. The basis for EPDs are the previously comprehensively recorded life cycle assessment data. Environmental impacts are thus made transparent and presented in a neutral manner. The information contained in the EPD does not have to be limited to the life cycle assessment. Additional technical information can also be included, in case of wall blocks made of light-weight concrete for example regarding their excellent insulation performance.

 

The most important EPD program operator in Germany is the Institute for Construction and Environment e.V. (IBU). From its program instructions, for example, the following steps to the finished EPD result:

The basis of an EPD are the product category rules (PCR). The requirements and basic contents of the EPD from PCR Part A that apply uniformly to all product groups are supplemented in Part B by product group-specific requirements and any explanations. The overall draft is submitted to the expert council (SVR), which checks it for conformity to standards, consistency between the product groups, completeness and appropriateness, if needed adjusts it and then approves it.

On the basis of PCR Parts A and B the building product manufacturers, like KLB-Klimaleichtblock, create the preliminary EPD for their product. For this they enter all required data into the online database system of the IBU. For a “Core EPD” according to DIN EN 15804 at a minimum the life cycle assessment data are required. An “IBU-EPD” additionally requires technical information regarding the product, interpretations of the life cycle assessment and possibly additional documentation. An example this can be seen in the EPD of the filled light-weight concrete masonry “KLB-Kalopor”.

For the final test the IBU assigns an independent verifier to the EPD. The verification is carried out on the basis of the ISO 14025 and DIN EN 15804. Following the verification report IBU publishes the EPD on its internet site. The validity of the EPD is generally five years.

An EPD is organised in modules, which orient themselves to the life cycles of the product: Manufacture (A1-3), Construction (A4-5), Use (B1-7) as well as Disposal (C1-4). These standard modules can be supplemented by an information module (D), which includes additional information for calculating the environmental quality, which lies outside of the life cycle. This includes for example the reuse and recycling potential. Not every EPD has to include all modules. The minimum are however modules A1-3. This is then called a “cradle to gate” analysis. “Cradle to grave” in comparison describes all phases A1-C4.

KLB-Klimaleichtblock started early on providing EPDs on the basis of comprehensive life cycle assessments. This is why the company is currently the only lightweight concrete manufacturer in Germany to have strong proofs for the sustainable quality of its high-performance masonry blocks with integrated insulation. For non-filled lightweight concrete blocks, the Bundesverband Leichtbeton has been offering corresponding association EPDs for years.

 

Advantages of EPDs

The basis of an EPD are the product category rules (PCR). The requirements and basic contents of the EPD from PCR Part A that apply uniformly to all product groups are supplemented in Part B by product group-specific requirements and any explanations. The overall draft is submitted to the expert council (SVR), which checks it for conformity to standards, consistency between the product groups, completeness and appropriateness, if needed adjusts it and then approves it.

On the basis of PCR Parts A and B the building product manufacturers, like KLB-Klimaleichtblock, create the preliminary EPD for their product. For this they enter all required data into the online database system of the IBU. For a “Core EPD” according to DIN EN 15804 at a minimum the life cycle assessment data are required. An “IBU-EPD” additionally requires technical information regarding the product, interpretations of the life cycle assessment and possibly additional documentation. As an example this can be seen in the EPD of the filled light-weight concrete masonry block “KLB-Kalopor”.

For the final test the IBU assigns an independent verifier to the EPD. The verification is carried out on the basis of the ISO 14025 and DIN EN 15804. Following the verification report IBU publishes the EPD on its internet site. The validity of the EPD is generally five years.

 

EPDs according to EN 15804 are not comparable statements. They also do not include evaluations. This is because building products and building materials are not end products: They do not develop their environmental impact until they are at or in the building. Consequently a comparison of their environmentally relevant characteristics is also only reasonable in the context of the building. In order to establish this comparability, many national and international building certification systems which frequently rely on life cycle assessments and EPDs have been established. The available EPDS by KLB-Klimaleichtblock are for example compatible with the known systems, such as DGNB, BNB, LEED and BREEAM, which are explained in the chapter “Systems for Building Certification”.

 

Systems for building certification

 

Building certification systems evaluate the quality of the sustainability of a building using standardised criteria. Depending on the overall degree of fulfilment of these criteria, which is verified and submitted by an external auditor, a certificate is issued. On the one hand, this controls the demands placed on the building and, on the other hand, serves as a valuable communication and marketing instrument. Often the assessment of individual sustainability aspects or life cycle phases is possible. Buildings assessed as particularly sustainable then receive for example a certificate in “platinum” (DGNB, LEED), in “gold” (BNB) or with the designation “outstanding” (BREEAM).

 

For calculating the environmental impacts of a building over its entire life cycle among others detailed information regarding the building products used is required. Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) represent life cycle assessment data relevant for building certification systems at product level and are verified by independent third parties. Inter alia they can serve as a reliable data foundation for the life cycle analysis of a building as well as proof for required characteristics of building products. KLB has therefore already started early on to gather comprehensive EPDs for its light-weight concrete masonry blocks.

DGNB BNB BREEAM LEED

German Seal of Quality Sustainable Construction (DGNB)

The DGNB Certification System encompasses up to 40 criteria, which are assigned to six topic fields: “Ecological Quality”, “Economic Quality”, “Sociocultural and Functional Quality” as well as “Technical Quality” flow into the overall assessment with a share of 22.5 % each, “Process Quality” with 10 %. “Location Quality” is indicated and assessed, but does not explicitly flow into the overall assessment, as the associated criteria can only be influenced to a very limited degree in the planning of the building. Depending on the overall fulfilment degree of the criteria, the German Association for Sustainable Construction e.V. (DGNB) issues a DGNB certificate in platinum, gold or silver – for existing buildings a bronze certification is also possible. New construction as well as existing buildings and quarters are certified. Additionally, a preliminary certification in the planning phase is possible.

 

The overall degree of fulfilment is thereby not solely decisive for the issuance of a certificate. In order to receive a certificate, a minimum degree of fulfilment must be achieved in each of the five assessment-relevant topic areas, which is 15 percentage points below the necessary overall degree of fulfilment (except for the bronze certification). A building can for example only receive a platinum certificate if the overall degree of fulfilment is at least 80 % and the degree of fulfilment of the individual topic areas is at least 65 % each.

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